Many companies have lenient Bring-Your-Own-(Mobile) Device (BYOD) policies since it reduces their costs and encourages longer work days. More recently, others have adopted Company Owned but Personally Enabled (COPE) device policies. An overly restrictive BYOD policy may be impossible to enforce. So, there should be a pragmatic balance of control and allowance with monitoring of devices and uses. Creating a robust BYOD policy to regulate devices also should be viewed as an important pre-cursor for companies facing subsequent litigation or wanting to undertake e-discovery. However, privacy, relevancy, and costs must be considered in mobile device data collections to ensure that they are limited only to responsive data.

In this two-hour live webcast, partner Cheryl Orr and a panel of thought leaders, practitioners, and professionals provided an in-depth analysis and discussion of the fundamentals, advantages, and disadvantages of BYOD for Mobile Devices in e-Discovery and the Challenges and Opportunities in 2016.

Key topics included:

  • Mobile Devices and e-Discovery
  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Policies
  • Fourth Amendment Implications
  • Electronically Stored Information (ESI) Data Sources
  • Electronic Discovery Reference Model
  • Mobile e-Discovery Planning
  • Mobile Device Security and Privacy Policies
  • Risky Employees, Mobile Devices, and Applications
  • Risky Data and Third Parties
  • Enforcing Device Compliance
  • Data Recovery Problems
  • On Premise or SaaS Mobile Device Management (MDM)
  • Mobile Application Management (MAM)
  • Best Practices
Source: The Knowledge Group’s LIVE Webcast